Shopping Cart

The Best Compression Socks for Edema

Last Updated February 27, 2021

When you sit or stand for long periods of time and lacks exercise, gravity actually affects your body even more.

It creates a challenge for the heart to pump and circulate blood down to the legs and back, which can lead to blood pooling in the legs.

This unhealthy buildup can turn into swelling in the feet, ankles and/or lower legs, which can feel uncomfortable or painful. Your legs may even feel like they are aching.

This could result in edema (a fancy medical term for “swelling”)

One way to prevent, and remedy, this issue is by wearing compression socks.

Want to Stop Swelling (Edema) Now?

ComproGear Compression Socks are designed to stop swelling instantly?

Click the button below to see the lineup of ComproGear Compression Socks:



What are Compression Socks?

Compared to the ordinary ones, these are uniquely designed to gently squeeze the feet and ankles. Depending on the length, knee-high socks also apply pressure onto the calves, while thigh-high socks, or leggings, also provide pressure on the thighs.

There is a common misconception that these are made out of lightweight, not-so-breathable materials – only used by the elderly, older patients or those who exercise frequently. In reality, anyone can wear them, although this is subject to certain conditions. For instance, young children may be unable to wear these, unless required for medical reasons.

Best Compression Socks For Edema

What Benefits Do Compression Socks Give?

Woman's swollen edema legs in the beach

According to an article published by Cleveland Clinic, foot surgeon Georgeanne Botek, DPM states that the “key intention is to promote better blood circulation in the legs” and that, although this proponent is a highly practical and common feature, it is quite underutilized. If only many people wear compression socks, they could potentially benefit – if they were aware of them.

Want to Stop Swelling (Edema) Now?

ComproGear Compression Socks are designed to stop swelling instantly?

Click the button below to see the lineup of ComproGear Compression Socks:



What Types are There?

There are generally three types of compression socks: graduated or medical compression stockings; anti-embolism stockings; and non-medical support hosiery.

Woman Running with the Best Compression Socks On

Graduated compression socks are more commonly made available and, thus, are what people use more frequently – especially when they exercise. It is named ‘graduated’ because of how the ankle part of the socks are the tightest, meaning your feet will experience the greatest degree of compression is situated here, and this tightness gradually decreases up the garment. Graduated ones are often used to treat chronic venous problems, such as edema. According to the US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, their design is uniquely made “for ambulatory patients and are manufactured under strict medical research and technical specifications, including consistency and durability, to provide a specific level of ankle pressure and graduation of compression.”

best compression stockings for edema, swollen

Anti-embolism stockings are for a more specific purpose, which is to maintain circulation for bed-bound patients, particularly for those post-surgery. This helps prevent reduce the risk of deep vein thrombosis.

Woman wearing best compression stockings for edema

Non-medical support hosiery are also for a more specific purpose, which is providing relief to tired, heavy and aching legs. These are different from the other two as the compression is uniform, and not graduated, and also exerts lesser compression. As they do not need to comply with medical and technical specifications, non-medical support hosiery can be purchased over the counter without any prescriptions.


What is Edema?

Edema, swollen, swelling

Edema is “swelling that is caused by fluid trapped in your body’s tissues,” according to Cleveland Clinic. This happens commonly in the feet, ankles and legs, however any other part of the body can be affected. It can be temporary or permanent, depending on its cause, so the way it is to be treated will be according to the condition that is causing it.

Your doctor or health professional may ask questions and/or give medical exams to determine the root cause.

Want to Stop Swelling (Edema) Now?

ComproGear Compression Socks are designed to stop swelling instantly?

Click the button below to see the lineup of ComproGear Compression Socks:



What are the Causes?

Causes of Swelling, Edema, Pregnant woman

Edema can be caused by various factors and conditions, such as:

  • Being pregnant – This is because the uterus adds pressure on the blood vessels in the lower half of the body.
  • Certain medications – Particularly those that are for blood pressure or pain control, but your body may not react positively to.
  • Certain illnesses or diseases – These include congestive heart failure; lung, liver, kidney and thyroid diseases; and venous problems.

What are the Symptoms?

You or someone you know may have edema if you notice any of the following signs:

  • The affected area is swollen.
  • Skin over affected area appears stretched and ‘shiny’.
  • dimple in the skin is left behind after you gently push a finger in the affected area for at least five seconds and remove it.
  • If the legs are the affected area, then this could lead to difficulty walking.
  • If the lungs are the affected area, then this could lead to difficulty breathing or coughing.
Symptoms of Edema, Swollen Foot

How do these Help with Swelling?

Best Compression Socks for Edema

Foot surgeon Georgeanne Botek, DPM explains that nearly 90% of leg disorders originate within the veins, and that many studies have confirmed the effectiveness in treating venous problems of the legs. Venous problems include venous insufficiency, in which blood is retained in the legs due to the failure of the valves in the veins functioning optimally. As a result, swelling – sometimes in the lower legs occur as there is lesser blood flow to the heart.

By using these, the skin gets gently squeezed, which increases the blood pressure in the tissues beneath the skin. Dr. Botek explained that this increased pressure “reduces excess leakage of fluid from the capillaries and it increases the absorption of this tissue fluid by the capillaries and lymphatic vessels.” Simply put, this equates to reduced swelling and prevention.

Want to Stop Swelling (Edema) Now?

ComproGear Compression Socks are designed to stop swelling instantly?

Click the button below to see the lineup of ComproGear Compression Socks:



Learn the Different Levels of Compression

These are available in a range of compression support levels. Each is measured in mmHg, which stands for millimeters of mercury, and it indicates the level of pressure or compression.

According to website Discount Surgical, “most commonly compression support stockings come in Mild (8-15 mmHg), Medium (15-20 mmHg), Firm (20-30 mmHg), X-Firm (30-40 mmHg) gradient compression levels.”

Below is a detailed list of the different compression levels and what they are used for:

Best Compression Socks for Edema, Man exercise

1. Mild (8-15 mmHg)

  • Prevents leg fatigue, due to sitting or standing for too long.
  • Prevents formation of venous problems, especially during pregnancy.
  • Relieves tired and aching legs from exercise.
  • Relieves minor swelling in the feet, ankles and/or lower legs.
  • Maintains the health of your legs.

Swollen legs, edema

2. Medium (15-20 mmHg)

  • Prevents leg fatigue, due to sitting or standing for too long. Ideal for traveling long distances.
  • Prevents formation of venous problems, especially during prenatal period.
  • Prevents deep vein thrombosis (DVT).
  • Prevents reappearance of varicose veins and spider veins; used during post-sclerotherapy treatment.
  • Relieves tired and aching legs.
  • Relieves minor swelling in the feet, ankles and/or lower legs.
Preganant woman with best compression stockings for edema

3. Firm (20-30 mmHg)

  • Prevents and relieves moderate to severe varicose veins, especially during pregnancy.
  • Prevents reappearance of varicose veins and spider veins; used during post-sclerotherapy treatment and post-surgical treatment.
  • Prevents orthostatic hypotension.
  • Prevents deep vein thrombosis (DVT).
  • Helps treat moderate to severe or lymphatic edema.
  • Helps manage active ulcers and manifestations of post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS).
  • Relieves superficial thrombophlebitis.
Sitting relax with the best Compression socks for edema

4. Extra Firm (30-40 mmHg)

  • Prevents and relieves moderate to severe varicose veins, especially during pregnancy.
  • Prevents reappearance of varicose veins and spider veins; used during post-sclerotherapy treatment and post-surgical treatment.
  • Prevents orthostatic hypotension and postural hypotension.
  • Prevents deep vein thrombosis (DVT).
  • Helps treat moderate to severe or lymphatic edema.
  • Helps manage active ulcers and manifestations of post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS).

What is Best for Edema?

Doctor checking in on patient with Edema, swollen foot

Any pair of compression socks are suitable for preventing and treating edema, however – enough with home remedies as it would be best to follow your doctor’s directions in terms of what type, length, size and compression level you should wear.

In terms of quality, we recommend ComproGear Compression Socks!

Want to Stop Swelling (Edema) Now?

ComproGear Compression Socks are designed to stop swelling instantly?

Click the button below to see the lineup of ComproGear Compression Socks:



Why ComproGear?

Man running, exercising with the best compression socks for edema

At only a price of $27.99 a pair, you can receive instant relief from compression socks of the highest quality. ComproGear comes at a 20-30 mmHg compression level and is available in six designs, from onyx black to sunset stripes. This is one of the perfect exercise tools – which means you can maintain the health of your legs whilst looking stylish on the feet. They are comfortable and are made from sturdy, lightweight, breathable, moisture-wicking fabrics.

Where Can I Buy?

Like other daily essential tools for your feet, you can easily purchase the best compression socks for edema online, these are not hard to find – such as ComproGear being readily available on Amazon. This ensures fast shipping and we also have a 100% Money Back Guarantee.

Tips on Maintaining Compression Socks

How to wash the best compression socks for edema

With good care, these will remain functional for a long time. Below is a list of tips on how to properly maintain them:

  • Wash after taking them off for the day. This is why having at least two pairs is ideal, as you can still wear a pair whilst waiting for the other pair to dry. Washing them routinely ensures that odor and bacteria do not build up, and that the material remains effective. By washing and drying these, they regain their original elasticity and compression.
  • Wash separately from other garments or wash with garments of the same color. This is important to learn in order to prevent any tear or damage to the fabric, they should be washed in a washing machine at a temperature of 30 or 40 degrees on a gentle wash cycle, with no fabric softeners. You can also wash by hand in lukewarm water then hang to dry. The actual washing instructions may vary by manufacturer, therefore, it is advisable to follow their instructions.
  • Store in a clean, dry easy to find area and properly fold them when not in use.
  • Try not to use the same pair for a prolonged amount of time. It would be good to switch between pairs every several hours or day.
  • Do not pull any loose threads. This will only damage the fabrics. These are better replaced once any threads have come lose.

Conclusion

Edema is a venous problem in which swelling occurs. The causes can vary, as do the symptoms. Therefore, the treatment varies upon the cause identified. When you wear compression socks – this could be one way of preventing and treating edema; they come in three types, of which two have graduated compression, suitable for treating edema. There are various compression levels, ranging from mild to extra firm. The level depends on the severity of one’s edema and is best advised by one’s medical professional. Once a pair of compression socks is owned, they will need to be maintained to ensure its longevity, such as by washing it after every use. Good quality compression socks that you can buy online are ComproGear Compression Socks.

Want to Stop Swelling (Edema) Now?

ComproGear Compression Socks are designed to stop swelling instantly?

Click the button below to see the lineup of ComproGear Compression Socks:



Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

Woman thinking about the best compression socks for edema

Are There Other Ways to Treat Edema?

As advised by Cleveland Clinic, in addition to treating any underlying diseases, other ways to treat edema and/or prevent fluid build-up in the body include the following:

  • Placing a pillow underneath the legs when lying down or sitting for prolonged periods, and the legs must be elevated above heart level.
  • Getting up from your seat and moving every now and then. Standing for long periods is also not advised.
  • Protecting the affected areas from additional pressure, injury and extreme temperatures.
  • Following your doctor’s advice in relation to prescription medications.

How do You Wear These?

  1. Smooth these out so that they lie flat and are not bunching or folded.
  2. Do not fold or roll the tops down, as this can make them too tight.
  3. Slip a sock on over a foot and gently pull the top to the ankle and upwards. Check again for any folds and smoothen them or readjust if there are any.

How Long Should You Wear These?

Wearing compression socks may feel uncomfortable, especially for first-time wearers. They can be worn for hours straight, but is is advised not to be worn overnight as lying horizontally can affect blood circulation. If they constantly feel uncomfortable, they can be taken off temporarily to readjust and adapt. However, if there are any adverse side effects, such as rashes, irritation or that it feels too tight, then they should be removed immediately.

Are These Safe to Wear During Pregnancy?

Yes. Swelling in the legs can occur. There are various compression levels available to wear, so you can select one, or have a doctor prescribe one for you, depending on the severity of the swelling.

Who Can Wear These?

  • Athletes, including runners and basketball players.
  • Pregnant women.
  • People with or at risk of venous or circulatory problems, such as DVT and varicose veins.
  • People who have just gotten surgery and are bed-ridden.
  • People who have difficulty moving their legs and/or must be seated continuously.
  • People who stand all day at work.
  • People who spend a lot of time sitting for work, e.g. pilots.

Want to Stop Swelling (Edema) Now?

ComproGear Compression Socks are designed to stop swelling instantly?

Click the button below to see the lineup of ComproGear Compression Socks:



References for Compression Socks

  1. “What You Should Know About Compression Socks,” 2020, HealthEssentials Cleveland Clinic, https://health.clevelandclinic.org/what-you-should-know-about-compression-socks/
  2. “Edema,” 2018, HealthEssentials Cleveland Clinic, https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/diseases/12564-edema
  3. “Edema: Management and Treatment,” 2018, HealthEssentials Cleveland Clinic, https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/diseases/12564-edema/management-and-treatment
  4. “WHICH COMPRESSION LEVEL IS RIGHT FOR YOU?,” Discount Surgical, https://www.discountsurgical.com/which-compression-level-is-right-for-you#:~:text=Support%20compression%20stockings%20are%20made,40%20mmHg)%20gradient%20compression%20levels.
  5. “How to look after compression stockings correctly,” Medi, https://www.medi.de/en/faq/compression-garments/caring/
  6. “How to Choose and Use Compression Stockings,” 2019, WebMD, https://www.webmd.com/dvt/choose-compression-stockings
  7. “Graduated compression socks,” 2014, US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4081237/