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ComproGear (Knee High) 20-30 mmHG Compression Socks

Intro

compression socks

The 20-30 mmHG Compression Socks. If you participate in a running club or have entered any footraces in the last few years, then you probably noticed that some runners were wearing 15 – 20 mmHg, 20 – 30 mmHg, or 30 – 40 mmHg knee high or thigh high compression socks.

Rather than being a fashion statement, these 1520 mmHg, 20 – 30 mmHg, or 3040 mmHg knee high or thigh high compression socks with extra-powerful elasticity are designed to improve running performance. Additionally, fans say that when they wear 15 – 20 mmHg, 20 – 30 mmHg, or 30 – 40 mmHg knee high or thigh high compression socks, their muscles don’t get so sore after a long run. Many users even say that their legs recover faster thanks to their compression socks.

who needs compression

How High Should They Go?

short length support hoses
long support hoses

While there are some products on the market that go thigh high, most runners are happy with the version that goes just to the knees. They say that this style is perfect for preventing blood from pooling in the feet. Colorful 15 – 20 mmHg, 20 – 30 mmHg, or 30 – 40 mmHg knee high or thigh high compression socks may be just what you need to start enjoying your runs and the recovery period that follows more than ever before. Of course, before that can happen, you probably need to know more about 15 – 20 mmHg, 20 – 30 mmHg, or 30 – 40 mmHg knee high or thigh high compression socks and how to choose the right pair for you.

What Are Support Hoses?

different pressure levels

The 15 – 20 mmHg, 20 – 30 mmHg, or 30 – 40 mmHg knee high or thigh high compression socks feature extra-strength and are elastic. Typically, 15 – 20 mmHg, 20 – 30 mmHg, or 30 – 40 mmHg knee high or thigh high compression socks make use of graduated compression. This means that they are tighter around the ankle area and gradually become less tight until they reach either the knee or the thigh length. Because the 15 – 20 mmHg, 20 – 30 mmHg, or 30 – 40 mmHg knee high or thigh high compression socks are so long and fitted, it is necessary to measure your leg at least at the ankle, calf and knee so that you get a proper fit. This is critical to your success with 15 – 20 mmHg, 20 – 30 mmHg, or 30 – 40 mmHg knee high or thigh high compression socks.

why wear them

If they are too loose, they won’t be effective. If they are too tight, they’ll act like a tourniquet and cut off blood flow. The main idea behind 15 – 20 mmHg, 20 – 30 mmHg, or 30 – 40 mmHg knee high or thigh high compression socks is that they slightly restrict the veins, arteries and muscles in your legs. Rather than being a hindrance, the right level of compression actually improves blood circulation.

Improved Blood Circulation May Improve Your Running

If you have problems with muscle fatigue or just overall weariness in the course of your long runs, then wearing 15 – 20 mmHg, 20 – 30 mmHg, or 30 – 40 mmHg knee high or thigh high compression socks may be a great idea for you.

Because the blood vessels and arteries in your legs are compressed by the 1520 mmHg, 20 – 30 mmHg, or 30 – 40 mmHg knee high or thigh high compression socks, your blood flows more quickly. That means rich oxygenated blood gets delivered to your cells in less time. Accordingly, you may notice that your endurance improves. You also may find that you don’t feel as tired during your run or even during the recovery period. Some runners have discovered that they don’t get sore muscles when they wear 15 – 20 mmHg, 20 – 30 mmHg, or 30 – 40 mmHg knee high or thigh high compression socks. This means that they recover faster and are free to go on with life or other workouts without pain.

The Post-Running Boost

Some runners prefer not to wear 15 – 20 mmHg, 20 – 30 mmHg, or 30 – 40 mmHg knee high or thigh high compression socks when they are actually engaged in their favorite sport. Instead, they put on 15 – 20 mmHg, 20 – 30 mmHg, or 30 – 40 mmHg knee high or thigh high compression socks after a workout to improve blood flow.

When blood circulates with greater efficiency, healing speeds up. This is critical because your real challenging workouts make tiny tears in your muscles. Your body naturally repairs these tears, making the muscles stronger than they were before. Of course, all of that tearing can be pretty painful. Nonetheless, it’s desirable because that’s what ultimately makes you stronger. The 15 – 20 mmHg, 20 – 30 mmHg, or 30 – 40 mmHg knee high or thigh high compression socks come to the rescue by aiding with the recovery process.

As you experience less soreness and faster healing, you’ll be able to get on with life and more workouts sooner than before. You’ll probably also feel less generally fatigued in the aftermath of a big run if you wear your compression socks, compression sleeves, or compression stockings post-workout.

Aren’t They Medical Devices?

Are they Medical Devices?

The 15 – 20 mmHg, 20 – 30 mmHg, or 30 – 40 mmHg knee high or thigh high compression socks aren’t a new innovation. They have been used for years by patients who are recovering from surgery or to help alleviate the symptoms of people suffering from conditions like diabetes. People who are chronically plagued by dizziness upon standing also may benefit from 15 – 20 mmHg, 20 – 30 mmHg, or 30 – 40 mmHg knee high or thigh high compression socks. Similarly, people who fly a lot or who are otherwise forced to remain seated for long periods of time have sworn by compression socks for years. That’s because these socks keep your blood moving so that it doesn’t pool in your veins, which may cause a harmful clot.

Any Differences in Compression?

While compression socks are useful medical devices, their advantages have made them attractive to runners as well. Of course, it’s possible that the amount of compression that is delivered by socks that are used as medical devices and the amount of compression from running socks may be really different. The Overall Benefits of Compression Socks include:

  • Boost Circulation
15 – 20 mmHg, 20 – 30 mmHg, or 30 – 40 mmHg knee high or thigh high compression socks boost circulation
  • Improve Lymphatic Drainage
15 – 20 mmHg, 20 – 30 mmHg, or 30 – 40 mmHg knee high or thigh high compression socks can improve lymphatic drainage
  • Encourage Venous Competence
15 – 20 mmHg, 20 – 30 mmHg, or 30 – 40 mmHg knee high or thigh high compression socks improve venous competence
  • Prevent Pooling of Blood in the Legs with compression socks
15 – 20 mmHg, 20 – 30 mmHg, or 30 – 40 mmHg knee high or thigh high compression socks can prevent blood pooling
  • Alleviate Swelling
15 – 20 mmHg, 20 – 30 mmHg, or 30 – 40 mmHg knee high or thigh high compression socks can prevent swelling
  • Prevent DVT Development
15 – 20 mmHg, 20 – 30 mmHg, or 30 – 40 mmHg knee high or thigh high compression socks can prevent DVT
  • Prevent Venous Ulcers
15 – 20 mmHg, 20 – 30 mmHg, or 30 – 40 mmHg knee high or thigh high compression socks can help prevent venous ulcers
  • Prevent Blood Clots from Forming in the Legs
15 – 20 mmHg, 20 – 30 mmHg, or 30 – 40 mmHg knee high or thigh high compression socks can help prevent blood clots
  • Boost Running Performance
15 – 20 mmHg, 20 – 30 mmHg, or 30 – 40 mmHg knee high or thigh high compression socks help boost running performance
  • Help Nurses Perform Better During Long Shifts
15 – 20 mmHg, 20 – 30 mmHg, or 30 – 40 mmHg knee high or thigh high compression socks help nurses during long shifts

Measuring Support Level

how to choose support level

In addition to size, the other critical factor to consider when purchasing 15 – 20 mmHg, 20 – 30 mmHg, or 30 – 40 mmHg knee high or thigh high compression socks is how tight they are. In other words, you’ll need to think about just how much compression is enough. The tightness of 15 – 20 mmHg, 20 – 30 mmHg, or 30 – 40 mmHg knee high or thigh high compression socks is measured in millimeters of Mercury. This is designated with the abbreviation mmHg. The higher the mmHg rating of a pair of socks is, the tighter they will be.

Assume that you spend a lot of time standing or that you just suffer from tired legs and feet on a regular basis. You might look for support socks with a 10-15 mmHg rating. If you need a bit more support for improving circulation and controlling leg and ankle swelling, you’ll want socks with a rating of 15-30 mmHg. The highest level of support is offered by compression socks with ratings of 30-40 mmHg. Normally, anything over 30 mmHg is best for medical purposes. Runners typically find that 20 – 30 mmHg compression socks offer the optimum level of support.

What Do these Hoses Mean?

How different are these Hosiery from the Rest

When you try 20 – 30 mmHg compression socks, you probably will discover that your legs feel far better in the midst of a tough run. That’s because the blood flow throughout your body is improved. However, 20-30 mmHg compression stockings place a special emphasis on your legs. This means that your feet and legs won’t feel as fatigued mid-workout. You may see your times improve, and you will almost certainly notice that your endurance is better than it was before. You have the option of removing your compression socks after your run or switching them out for a clean pair. Doing so may help your legs to feel more energized for the rest of the day while also helping your whole body to recover faster. Clinical features of 20 – 30 mmHg compression socks are:

  • Provide a Controlled Pressure to the Legs
15 – 20 mmHg, 20 – 30 mmHg, or 30 – 40 mmHg knee high or thigh high compression socks provide controlled pressure
  • Pressure is Degressive Upwards
15 – 20 mmHg, 20 – 30 mmHg, or 30 – 40 mmHg knee high or thigh high compression socks provide degressive pressure
  • Compression is Always Higher at the Ankle Area
prescribed mmHg of compression socks is higher at the ankle
  • Compression is Always Decreasing toward the Knee or Thigh
compression of compression socks decreases upwards
  • The Action of the Compression Socks is known as Mechanical Action
mechanical action of compression socks
  • Pressure is only exerted when the Compression Socks are Applied
compression socks applying pressure to the legs

Should Your Compression Socks Go to the Thigh or the Knee?

This is really a matter of personal preference. Some people love the extra support that comes with 20-30 mmHg compression stockings thigh high length. They feel that it boosts their blood circulation that much more, helping them to power through an extra-long run. Other people dislike wearing a sock that goes over this critical joint. Some say that it makes them feel too warm while others just feel that it’s a bit too restrictive on the joint. The 20-30 mmHg compression stockings remain the most popular choice for runners at this time. However, because this is purely a matter of personal preference, you may want to try both styles before deciding which one works for you. Alternatively, you may go with the solution that has worked for other runners. It involves wearing the shorter socks for runs and then exchanging them for thigh-high compression socks for the recovery period. It’s the best of both worlds.

Are Compression Socks Right For You?

Now that you are familiar with the 20 – 30 mmHg compression socks meaning, you are better equipped to decide whether or not these running accessories are a smart choice for you. It makes sense to talk to other, perhaps more experienced, runners to get their take on compression socks. While some people love them, others may say that they didn’t perceive a real difference.

Some Positive Studies on Knee or Thigh Compression Socks

The results of scientific studies on 1520 mmHg, 2030 mmHg, or 3040 mmHg knee high or thigh high compression socks for runners are mixed at this point. For instance, one study concluded that wearing compression socks after running a marathon improved running performance in a treadmill test performed two weeks later. However, another study found that runners who wore compression socks during and after a run experienced little to no advantage. That said, there haven’t really been enough studies to determine once and for all just how effective 15 – 20 mmHg, 20 – 30 mmHg, or 30 – 40 mmHg knee high or thigh high compression socks are for runners. Maybe that will come with time. For now, it’s best to rely on your personal experiences and preferences.  

What Doctors Have Been Doing Regardless of What Studies Have Been Finding

However, it is worth pointing out that doctors have been prescribing the use of 15 – 20 mmHg, 20 – 30 mmHg, or 30 – 40 mmHg knee high or thigh high compression socks for decades for a variety of medical reasons. What is known about 15 – 20 mmHg, 20 – 30 mmHg, or 30 – 40 mmHg knee high or thigh high compression socks is that they do improve circulation, they can make your legs feel more energizes and they do prevent blood from pooling in your feet. These advantages alone may be enough to help you decide in favor of wearing 15 – 20 mmHg, 20 – 30 mmHg, or 30 – 40 mmHg knee high or thigh high compression socks.

How to Wear Support Hoses

  • Pull-On Method
pull-on method
  • Use a Doff n Donner
use a doff n donner
  • Use a One-Hand Donner
use a one-hand donner
  • Use a Donning Device
use a donning device

Giving Compression Socks a Road Test

Take careful measurements of your legs before purchasing a pair of 20 – 30 mmHg compression socks. This will ensure the proper fit, which is critical to a successful test run. This level of compression typically is acceptable to most runners, so it’s a good place to start. Nonetheless, keep in mind that everyone is different. You may find that you need slightly more or less compression, and that’s fine. The important thing is that you give yourself plenty of training time with your compression socks before your next race. In fact, it’s never a good idea to try out any new equipment on the day of your “big race.” That includes shoes and compression socks. If those socks are too tight, you’ll run into painful problems. If they are too loose, they’ll be falling down. With 15 – 20 mmHg, 20 – 30 mmHg, or 30 – 40 mmHg knee high or thigh high compression socks, you definitely want to be in the just-right Goldilocks zone. The best way to get yourself there is by experimenting with different styles to find what works best for you.

Be sure to share your experiences with other runners. You never know who might be inspired by your story of improved performance and recovery as a result of your use of 20-30 mmHg compression stockings.